Speak at School

Share personal stories and information about hearing loss to transform an entire generation's perspective!

Idea At A Glance

Starting with just one school, begin a nation-wide educational movement to help young people appreciate the value of hearing. Speaking to school-aged children will help ensure that future generations recognize hearing loss as an important health issue.

If you have hearing loss, you could start a speakers program to share your personal story with students. You could educate young people about what it is really like to have a hearing loss. Your personal stories can help encourage them to take care of their hearing and speak about hearing loss with their parents.

If you do not have hearing loss, you could collect relevant information and spread the word at schools about hearing loss prevention and awareness. At the event, you could hand out information about hearing loss, ear plugs, and decibel charts.

Inspiration

Macmillan is a non-profit, charity organization in the United Kingdom that provides health care, information, and support to people affected by cancer. To raise general awareness of cancer and encourage healthy lifestyle choices, Macmillan offers a free speakers program where representatives from the organization can present at assemblies or other school events. These talks can help motivate students to support organizations like Macmillan and volunteer to help in different ways.

Potential Impact

Reaching out to young people through a speakers program can help change an entire generation's perspective on hearing health and hearing loss.

A narrative style, where students learn about hearing loss through a personal story of challenges and achievements, can help motivate students to reflect on the message and discover personal meaning in the talk.

If students share what they learned with their parents, it could motivate family members to change their behavior and contemplate taking action on their hearing. 

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